Fuchsia spp (Ladys Eardrops) Monthly Plant Care Reminders

Last updated: 06-07-2018

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Fuchsia spp (Ladys Eardrops) Monthly Plant Care Reminders

Feed once with an organic fertilizer designed for blooming plants.
3. Water
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. When conditions become dry and the Santa Ana winds blow, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
4. Mulch
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
5. Pest/Disease Inspection
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
6. Treat for Pest/Disease
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
October
1. Water
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. When conditions become dry and the Santa Ana winds blow, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
2. Pest/Disease Inspection
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
3. Treat for Pest/Disease
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
Buy
When's the best time to buy this plant? When can you buy these from seed (if you can)? When is it usually available? What are things to look for when you're buying it? Or anything other tidbit of information you can share!
March
Feed once with an organic fertilizer designed for blooming plants.
Water
Is there a time to reduce or increase watering? Any special requirements? Things to avoid during certain times of the year?
March
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. When conditions become dry and the Santa Ana winds blow, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
April
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. When conditions become dry and the Santa Ana winds blow, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
May
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. They do best in "June gloom." When conditions become hot and dry, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
June
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. They do best in "June gloom." When conditions become hot and dry, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
July
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. Mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
August
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. Mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
September
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. When conditions become dry and the Santa Ana winds blow, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
October
Keep the soil surrounding the plant moist but not soggy. When conditions become dry and the Santa Ana winds blow, mist the plants periodically to prevent the leaves from drying out and crisping up.
Prune
When's a good time to prune this plant? How about deadheading, pinching back, trimming or any other grooming? Any special requirements?
February
Fuchsia flowers appear on new growth, so prune before new growth begins. Cut back by no more than two-thirds, removing crossing branches and to shape as desired.
March
Fuchsia flowers appear on new growth, so prune before new growth begins. Cut back by no more than two-thirds, removing crossing branches and to shape as desired.
September
Since blooms appear on new growth, cut back Cut back by two-thirds once the plant finishes with the fall bloom. Cut out crossing branches and prune to shape. Expect new growth within a month.
October
Cut back by two-thirds once the plant finishes with the fall bloom. Cut out crossing branches and prune to shape. Expect new growth within a month.
Mulch
Does this plant need to be mulched? Are there specific types of Mulch which are better for this plant? How much?
April
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
May
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
June
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
July
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
August
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
September
Maintain a 3-inch layer of shredded bark around the base of the plant out to the drip-line.
Pest/Disease Inspection
What are the common problems this plant will face and when should you look for them to appear?
April
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
May
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
June
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
July
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
August
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
September
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
October
Check for signs of fuchsia gall mite, which causes distorted leaves covered in red hairs. Also check for spider mites, which cause stippling on the leaves and white flies, which are evident by the white cloud of insects that fly up when you shake the plant.
Treat for Pest/Disease
How do you treat the common problems for this plant? What products or concoctions or natural means do you use? Any special requirements?
April
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
May
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
June
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
July
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
August
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
September
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
October
Avoid further infestation of fuchsia gall mite by pruning out and discarding all infected foliage. Treat spider mites by spraying with horticultural and prevent future infestation with regular misting. Treat white flies by spraying with neem oil.
Transplant
When's the best time to dig up and transplant this from one spot to another? (This is different than planting). Any special requirements?
April
Transplant in a location with bright shade and rich, well-draining soil.
May
Transplant in a location with bright shade and rich, well-draining soil.
June
Transplant in a location with bright shade and rich, well-draining soil.
Propagate
When's a good time to divide, take cuttings, layer or propagate this plant. Any special requirements?
March
Pinch out 2- to 4-inch-long growing tips, removing them just about the second or third set of leaves. Remove bottom leaves and dip the end in rooting hormone,making sure to cover any root nodes, which are the bumps left from the removed leaves. Insert the cutting into a mixture of half horticultural sand and half peat moss. Cover to keep moist. Place in a warm location such as a sunny windowsill or greenhouse. The cuttings should root within 3-4 weeks. You will know they have done so when you tug on them gently and they seem secure. Remove plastic and transplant them into a small container in an organic potting soil. Once the plants have reached 4 to 5 inches tall, they can be planted in the ground.
April
Pinch out 2- to 4-inch-long growing tips, removing them just about the second or third set of leaves. Remove bottom leaves and dip the end in rooting hormone,making sure to cover any root nodes, which are the bumps left from the removed leaves. Insert the cutting into a mixture of half horticultural sand and half peat moss. Cover to keep moist. Place in a warm location such as a sunny windowsill or greenhouse. The cuttings should root within 3-4 weeks. You will know they have done so when you tug on them gently and they seem secure. Remove plastic and transplant them into a small container in an organic potting soil. Once the plants have reached 4 to 5 inches tall, they can be planted in the ground.
May
Pinch out 2- to 4-inch-long growing tips, removing them just about the second or third set of leaves. Remove bottom leaves and dip the end in rooting hormone,making sure to cover any root nodes, which are the bumps left from the removed leaves. Insert the cutting into a mixture of half horticultural sand and half peat moss. Cover to keep moist. Place in a warm location such as a sunny windowsill or greenhouse. The cuttings should root within 3-4 weeks. You will know they have done so when you tug on them gently and they seem secure. Remove plastic and transplant them into a small container in an organic potting soil. Once the plants have reached 4 to 5 inches tall, they can be planted in the ground.
June
Pinch out 2- to 4-inch-long growing tips, removing them just about the second or third set of leaves. Remove bottom leaves and dip the end in rooting hormone,making sure to cover any root nodes, which are the bumps left from the removed leaves. Insert the cutting into a mixture of half horticultural sand and half peat moss. Cover to keep moist. Place in a warm location such as a sunny windowsill or greenhouse. The cuttings should root within 3-4 weeks. You will know they have done so when you tug on them gently and they seem secure. Remove plastic and transplant them into a small container in an organic potting soil. Once the plants have reached 4 to 5 inches tall, they can be planted in the ground.


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